CAN PR Review

These individuals told me they could produce and market a “radio ready” single with an award-winning producer for close to $6k (5K plus taxes). They said they represented well-known artist like Nick Cannon, Kresha Turner and Shawn Mendes. In the end I had to fire two producers they hired because their quality was terrible and found out they tried to hire a guitar players for a few hundred dollars out of the budget to make the track (who is admittedly not a producer at all). Through my contacts in the industry I later found out that people who had worked with them also had poor experiences. Based on their information, I learned that the company does not represent any of these well-known artists and actually represents A Loft Hotels instead who hosts these artists for events (which becomes clear once you follow their online posts regarding their representation of such artists). While Can PR has worked with Shawn Mendes on one release (because the owner and him are old friends), the results earned were a mere 4000 hits online, whereas his follow up release with the same producer only months later earned Mendes 830,000 hits online. I kindly requested to break their contract with them and receive a portion of the money back but was refused anything at all. When I highlighted that they had not fulfilled any of their contractual obligations they said they were not bound by their contract. I had to hire a lawyer to try to negotiate and have still not been successful. When the lawyer attempts to call their office at different times of the day and even from different numbers, no one ever answers (they have not once). When told them via email that an honest review would be posted online of my experience, they threatened to sue for defamation. | This situation has resulted in huge delays for creating new music releases and income that could have been generated from those releases via sales, royalties, publishing deals, etc. | Below are the details of my account with them, you can make up your own mind as to how to proceed with Can Public Relations Toronto, Can PR Toronto, CanPR Toronto, CPR Toronto (canpr.ca), Mariam Ghoneim and Mo Ghoneim, Brian Arnold and Marie Francesca) for yourself. | Details: | In 2016, I met with Brian Arnold, Music Manager, at the Can Public Relations Toronto (Also known as Can PR or CPR) office where he informed me of a new “Artist Development” program that Can PR was rolling out and that he was in charge of. He described this program as a “game changer” multiple times. This program involved Can PR producing a Radio Ready Single with an AWARD-WINNING PRODCER and the supporting PR materials to market the Single. He also claimed that the company represented well-known artists such as Nick Cannon and Kresha Turner. In a previous phone calls with Brian Arnold, the originally price for the program was $3000. However, during this meeting I was told that due to the genre it would cost more to produce and the price was now $5000 plus HST. Brian Arnold explained that he wanted to leverage this opportunity to pitch and get me signed with his label contacts. | I was sent a contract to sign by Brian Arnold and was informed I only had 7 days to accept the offer or it was off the table (this should have been the first clue that there was a problem). The original contract had the wrong dates and was requesting more payments for more money than originally agreed upon. I had it fixed. It also stated that Can PR would retain 20% of all moneys including direct moneys, sales, earnings, royalties, bonuses, shares of profit and all other incomes received for the product that would be developed during the term of the agreement whether directly or indirectly. | The following month I received an invoice from Can PR owners Mariam Ghoneim and Mo Ghoneim for $5,650.00 with the name of the talent listed as another pop artist, which was strange since I was told that that only reason they were paying that price was because of the particular genre. So why are they charging a pop artist the same? (Another red flag) I had CPR correct it and made the required deposit of $2000. | I met with Brian Arnold at the Can PR office where he informed me he had a producer who would write the single. I was never informed who the producer would be, heard their catalogue or was given any insight on what they were writing let alone the opportunity to be part of the writing process. | Then, Mariam Ghoneim and Mo Ghoneim sent me an invoice, which did not reflect the original deposit made to the company and stated that I still owed them $4,4433.33. Once again, I brought this to Can PR’s attention and they corrected the issue. | I was eventually sent the first draft of the first song, which was absolutely horrible. I called Brian Arnold and expressed my dissatisfaction; the production quality was very poor, the lyrics and overall song were for a very young singer and the song was very pop. Brian Arnold said that he would have changes made to the song. Brian Arnold later sent a text saying that he had listened to the track (for the first time, which was interesting since he had it sent to me without previously listening to it – not professional) and that he saw what I was saying. He would have it fixed. | The producer and I were now in contact as he had obtained my details from Can PR. He stated he was having difficulty making the changes and that he would send over some other catalogue songs to decide from. I was highly disappointed with the level of the work produced by this producer and contacted Brian Arnold requesting that he let that producer go from the project. | After this, Brian Arnold found a new producer who was willing to work “pro bono”. Again I was not given the producers name, or was offered the opportunity to review their catalogue of work. | I received a first draft of the new song and was informed by Brian Arnold not to be too concerned about the quality as it was just a demo. I recorded the song with the producer. Later that day they received what was labeled as a “rough mix”. I forwarded this to Can PR, Brian Arnold and I both agreed that they thought the song was all right for a rough mix but had some editing notes. When I received a final file for the song it sounded very similar to the original rough version. I told Brian Arnold that I did not think the quality was up to par. Brian Arnold agreed and editing notes were sent to the producer. | Weeks later I received an email from the producer asking how I felt about the mix I had received. He had never been sent any editing notes. I was later sent an updated mix, which again was not of the quality I had originally been lead to expect from a so-called “award-winning producer”. At this point I told Brian Arnold that I was very unhappy with how the project was being managed and that I could no longer feel confident in Can PR’s abilities to produce a single for me. I requested a resolution to the situation. | Months later, I met with owners Mo Ghoneim and Mariam Ghoneim. During this “meeting”, Mo Ghoneim requested that I reiterate what happened because although “they trusted Brian, they wanted to hear my side of the story,” they said. They asked me many questions related to the project and what happened. They then went on to question me about my future music goals, what companies and producers I was now working with and who my distributors were, which is all fairly appropriate. They then asked me how I pay for my music and what I did for a living, which was very inappropriate. In the end, I felt as though I had been through an interrogation and CPR offered no solution to the issue but simply escorted me out stating they would speak with their team and get back to me. | Several days later I contacted CPR to inform them that I would prefer not to pursue any type of PR services and would like some money back, the original payment minus any costs I approved. This was a very reasonable request, as their company had not fulfilled any of the expectations laid out in the contract. | CAN PR refused to provide any type of compensation, whatsoever. They informed me that they are not bound by their contract. This was completely unacceptable, as they spent almost no money on the production (just a few hundred dollars of the 5k budget). I told them I would be taking my case to court. I hired a lawyer to try to negotiate the situation with them and after we sent them multiple letters and attempted to call them many times had no success. No one at their “office” has ever picked up the phone…ever! | After all of this, I had a phone call with a guitarist I used to work with regularly and who Brian Arnold met through me. He informed me that Brian Arnold asked him to produce my song and offered him a mere $250-$300 to do it. While he is a very skilled guitarist, he is admittedly not a professional producer by any means. He does not make a living producing and has no major credits or awards for music. | Since this whole situation, we have been in contact with individuals who have worked closely with Can PR who revealed that they do not represent Nick Cannon and that this is indeed a spin. They actually represent A Loft Hotels, which is hosting a Nick Cannon project. They freely promote Nick Cannon on their website as if he is a client. I feel very deceived by this misrepresentation, having felt that their services would have been of better quality and their conduct more professional due to the fact that they had such established entertainers under their belt. This is one of the reasons I agreed to work with them in the first place. | We also recently learned that while Can PR has once worked with Shawn Mendes, the results earned were a mere 4000 hits online, whereas his follow up release with the same producer only months later have earned Mendes 830,000 hits online. The reason they had the opportunity to work with Mendes was due to the fact that one of the owners and Mendes were old friends. |

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Name: CAN PR

Country: Canada

State:

City: Toronto, Ontario

Address: 1 Yonge St., Suite 180

Phone: 289-221-3275

Website: canpr.ca/

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